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Short, Marlon

Page history last edited by Marlon Short 7 years, 11 months ago

Marlon Short

American Literature

Dr. Heiniger

Final Project

Return to Roster

 

Name: 

Major:

 


 

 

Personal Online Presentation Material:

Group Number: ---

Term: ---

 


Final Paper

  1. The Nineteenth Century in Print and Making of America Project: finding an artifact from after 1865

    1. Find and identify an artifact from online databases above.

    2. Find and identify three possible primary texts for your final paper (American literature written before 1865 that is not being studied in class) 

  2.  Race, Sex, and Citizenship: Redefining America 

    1. Think about the course theme of race, sex, and citizenship in ethnic American literature. In 3-5 paragraphs, define this theme/term (or some other theme from the course). What are the criteria for your theme/term? When and where do we see this theme/term being used (and how)?  

  3.  Doing a Close Reading 

    1. Select one passage from the text and do a close reading (3-5 paragraphs). The close reading should tie into the theme for the paper. 

  4.  Making Connections: texts and artifacts 

    1. Think about the course theme of American encounters. In 3-5 paragraphs, discuss how you see this theme (or some other theme from the course) developing in both your artifact and one of your primary texts 

  5.  Secondary Sources 

    1.  Create a list of possible sources (5 secondary, scholarly texts) from your annotated bibliography.

      1.  See "Primary vs Secondary Sources" if you have questions about what constitutes secondary texts.  

  6.  Thesis and Outline 

  7.  Revising a Paper 

  8.  Reflection Letter and Participation

 


Daily Course Work 

  • What was the main point of the article we read about short fiction: "The Remarkable Reinvention of Very Short Fiction"? Its about  the popularity of these “iridescent insects” has continued to grow  overtime. 
  • What EVIDENCE did the author give to support this claim? It stated Yet few seem to know exactly why these tiny fictions have become popular, or even what they are.
  • How does this relate to the short stories we read from Sudden Fiction?   We tend to relate the literature from a heritage or way of style.  
  • In "Cannibals and Explorers" - a MICROSTORY - Ana Maria Shua makes a commentary about the behavior of European explorers and in the New World. What is she saying? How does the condensed form of the microstory enhance her message (see The Remarkable Reinvention of Very Short Fiction for ideas about the power of these mini-stories)? I feel like she is trying to say that they are wrong.
  • How does Fernando Benavidez's story "Montezuma, My Revolver" related the history of conflict between Native Americans and Europeans to the present? Why is this significant? It relates back in the day when Native Americans and Europeans had to fight for their land. 
  • Don Quixote is a satiric Spanish epic critiquing Spanish military and chivalric ideals (and actions). It was written by Miguel de Cervantes in the 1600s (as Spain sentconquistadors to plunder the New World).  What do you think Juan Martinez is saying about the relationship between modern life and the past in "Customer Service at the Karaoke Don Quixote"? I feel like he is saying that we should do things differently in life and throw the old habits away and start with a better life. 

 

Genre:

How does the genre shape the narrative?

It shapes because they can relate to alot of things.

How does it compare to other genres we've read?

It all is a story, when there is an cause and effect.

Can a nonfiction novel have a hero?

Yes a nonfiction novel could have a hero in many different ways.

Character Development:

How is the character of Manjiro Nakahama developed?

It kind of shows a life story in order.

What imagery does the author use? 

author explains in details what is going on at that scene.

How does Manjiro’s experience of encountering the West allow the Western reader to see our world with new eyes?

Since he's not from where we live, he experience different things that we do different. 

Nature:

How does Nature become a part of the heroic narrative? The animals and outside sources.

 

How does Manjiro Nakahama's map emphasize his global experiences?

He has traveled all over the world and learned about different culture outside of his.

Do you feel inspired to join one of the nature societies that Dr. Vlasopolos mentions in her preface?

Yes because I would like to learn about other cultures.

How does Manjiro’s map resemble his journey in the novel?

shows all the areas that he has visited.

 

 

Questions for Friday: 

  1. Would he rather live in Japan or the U.S. and why does he make the decision(s) to live where he does? I feel like he would like to live either place. He can live in the USA to better himself educational wise. Or he would rather be around people thats more related to his culture.  

  2. How does Manjiro relate to the ocean (use the map above and the text)? He relates because he been all over the globe.

  3. If the roles were switched, could Manjiro have been as successful? He probably would not because the location of where he lives and being able to adapt

  4. Give two examples of continuity in Manjiro's experiences and relationships with people in different places. Friendship with capt. Davis, and Denzo and Goeman.

 

American Hero Definition: I believe my definition of an American hero is someone who shows courage, and who risk their lives daily in many circumstances. also people who wishes to accomplish a dream that they would like to complete. 

Artifact: 

http://www.titanic-plan.de/i_lite.html

 

Making connections and using Artifacts

 

Mark Twain

 

https://www.loc.gov/item/2014645012/

 

Artifact:                                                               Main Text:

Its calm                                                                       Authors are sometimes out of the box

Seems very quiet                                                         it takes patience to actually write a book

Comfortable                                                    Sometimes it’s hard to actually get books published

Reading newspaper of some sort                    

 

Artifact

http://blog.blantonmuseum.org/files/2015/01/EL113.028_Gilliam_Red-April_428H.jpg

red april

 

Sam Gilliam  paper

 

This is actually a close reading of your text and artifact, not a report on a historic person. This could be background information for your close reading, but this is not a close reading. A close reading would look at Gilliams artwork and compare the meaning or message of that artwork to a literary text (like a poem). And all of the information here should be CITED (reference the sources used with in-text citations).  

Outline:

 

Thesis: Two modern artists do A, B, and C.

Sound and Color

 

Abstraction in text and abstraction in visual art

 

 

Questioning reality and heroes

 


 

 

 

https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/why-must-itself-every-park - e.e. cummings (

            I’m writing a paper on a color field painter name Sam Gilliam. The purpose of this paper is to write about a specific artifact that interest me. I will be talking about Sam Gilliam background and major accomplishments that he has received. From what I’ve read from a book about Sam Gilliam, color field painting is very different from your usual painters.  

Sam Gilliam was born on November 30, 1933, in Tupelo Mississippi. He was born of seventh of eight children. His mother and father name is Sam and Estery Gilliam. Sam Gilliam was a veteran in the army. He served for two years from 1956 to 1958. Sam Gilliam painted in elementary school. He was encouraged by his fifth grade art teacher and an art program at Madison Junior High School. A lot of people in his school had acknowledged for his talents. They had let him do his artwork on holidays. He drew for Christmas parades, thanksgiving, and Easter. As a hobby the artist collected antique toys, mechanical banks, and pieces of marble from around the world.  He has a wife name Dorothy Butler who taught at Louisville public school, that’s a well-known journalist, and he has three daughters.  After the years he served in the military he decided to go to college. He always wanted to be a painter. Sam Gilliam is a globally acknowledged modern Color Field painter most famous for the big, color-splattered canvases he hung from ceilings and walls during the late 1960s and 1970s. The drape paintings attracted international attention for their innovative use of color. Sam Gilliam had a passion for art. Gilliam also at one time was associated with the Washington color school.  Sam Gilliam love for teaching begins in art school in Louisville. He taught for years in the Washington public schools, and then the Maryland Institute College of Art and for several years at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburg. His work artwork was becoming very good. By 1993 his artwork had cost between $25,000 to $55,000 dollars. And for some reason people loved him. They had supported him all the way with his work financially.

When he was in school he became very successful for his hard work. At the time he went to school, he has earned his bachelor and master’s degree in fine arts from Louisville Kentucky. On Sam Gilliam spare time, he had spent time conducting workshops, taking part in panel discussions and giving talks to the people of the United States. Later Sam Gilliam had started eventually doing collage paintings in mostly black shades. Sam Gilliam became a color field painter and lyrical Abstractionist artist. Lyrical abstractionist is two related but distinctly separate trends in post war modernist painting. Some people also say Sam Gilliam work has been described as belonging to abstract expressionism and lyrical abstraction. Art that Sam Gilliam works on are on stretched, rapped, and wrapped canvas, and adds sculptural 3d elements. The folds in the canvases, however, were not created at random but instead reflect Gilliam's specific idea about how he wanted his paintings to be installed.

Sam Gilliam decided to work with unsupported canvases. After he had seen a women hanging laundry outside the window of his Washington studio, he decided not to use a frame or stretcher for his work. He just draped and hung large pieces of paint-stained canvases from ceilings, walls, or on floors. One of his draped series of six canvases name seahorses was done for the Philadelphia Museum of Art and hangs from the outside walls of two adjacent wings of the museum the drapery of marble on ancient statues of Greek gods.

Later on in the 1970’s, he had changed his way on how he paints. Instead of him staining and saturating wet canvases he spattered and built up many layers of thick acrylic paint on them. Then later in the 1980’s he focused on making geometric collages, stretching the middle portion of his canvas and collaging onto it geometric shapes.

 

Final Project Rubric 

 

For the Final Project Rough Draft Workshop, begin by copying and pasting the rubric below onto YOUR wiki page with the rough draft of your paper. Remember, if BOTH the paper and the rubric are directly pasted to the wiki, it's a LOT easier for your reviewers.

 

Try to leave as many comments as I did on the paper above for your paper here.

 

Name (paper): ____Marlon Short___________________

Name (reviewer 1): _______Kelvin Forson__________________ 

Name (reviewer 2): ______Michael Mawdsley___________________

American Literature I Final Paper Rubric

 

 

Satisfactory

Unsatisfactory

Comments

Organization

Strong thesis at the conclusion of the introduction to guide the paper.

Thesis connected and supported in all body paragraphs.

Thesis makes a strong argument about a single theme or idea using the primary text and artifact.

Discussion of the primary text and artifact is coherent and succinct. 

Thesis is vague or spread throughout the introduction and the paper.

Thesis is not clearly connected to all body paragraphs.

Thesis does not make a strong argument about the primary text and/or artifact.

Kelvin: Your thesis state was really good. I like the way you brought up who was the painter what he painted and also how he painted.  

Close Reading

Analyzes the theme of the American hero in or through a primary text and artifact.

Close reading brings the primary text and artifact together in meaningful ways.

Places close reading in conversation with secondary sources.

Summarizes and paraphrases evidence from the primary text to support the close reading (only using direct quotes when it is necessary to analyze the language).

Does not clearly analyze a theme from American Literature in or through a primary text and/or artifact.

Close reading does not relate the primary text and artifact in meaningful ways (although it may discuss both separately).

Does not situate close reading among secondary sources.

Primarily summarizes the text or quotes it (rather than analyzing it).

 

Support (Research)

Integrates support from secondary sources to support close reading.

Creates a clear conversation with secondary sources (without being overpowered by them).

Uses strong evidence from secondary sources.

Summarizes and paraphrases evidence except when quotations are necessary.

Does not integrate support from secondary sources.

Argument is either overpowered or disconnected from secondary sources.

Evidence from secondary sources is not clearly connected with the argument.

Uses unnecessary quotes from the secondary source.

 

Pre-Writing

Completed all pre-writing activities on-time (includingconferences and rough draft workshop)

Did not complete all pre-writing activities on-time.

 

Presentation

Addresses the main points of the paper in a succinct and engaging way.

Interactive and creative online presentation with text and visual elements (NOT a power point)

Does not address the main points of the paper.

Is not interactive or online.

Does not include text and/or visual elements.

 

 


Final Conferences

 

I will be giving you MY feedback during conferences next week. 

 

Be sure to sign up for one of the conference times on the wiki here: CONFERENCES (also located on COURSE). Remember, conferences will be held in MY OFFICE (Rish Hall 002). Please remember to arrive a few minute early so that conferences can run on-time (we do not have any time to go over or make up missed conferences). 

 

You will receive THREE DAYS of attendance credit for you 10-minute conference! 

 

Marlon Short

American Literature

Dr. Heiniger

Final Project

 

Sam Gilliam

I’m writing a paper on a color field painter name Sam Gilliam. I will be talking about Sam Gilliam background and major accomplishments that he has received. From what I’ve read from a book about Sam Gilliam, color field painting is very different from your usual painters.  

Sam Gilliam was born on November 30, 1933, in Tupelo Mississippi. He was born of seventh of eight children. His mother and father name is Sam and Estery Gilliam. Sam Gilliam was a veteran in the army. He served for two years from 1956 to 1958. Sam Gilliam painted in elementary school. He was encouraged by his fifth grade art teacher and an art program at Madison Junior High School. A lot of people in his school had acknowledged for his talents. They had let him do his artwork on holidays. He drew for Christmas parades, thanksgiving, and Easter.As a hobby the artist collected antique toys, mechanical banks, and pieces of marble from around the world.  He has a wife name Dorothy Butler who taught at Louisville public school, that’s a well-known journalist, and he has three daughters.  After the years he served in the military he decided to go to college. He always wanted to be a painter. Sam Gilliam is a globally acknowledged modern Color Field painter most famous for the big, color-splattered canvases he hung from ceilings and walls during the late 1960s and 1970s. Thedrape paintings attracted international attention for their innovative use of color. Sam Gilliam had a passion for art. Gilliam also at one time was associated with the Washington color school.  Sam Gilliam love for teaching begins in art school in Louisville. He taught for years in the Washington public schools, and then the Maryland Institute College of Art and for several years at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburg. His work artwork was becoming very good. By 1993 his artwork had cost between $25,000 to $55,000 dollars. And for some reason people loved him. They had supported him all the way with his work financially( Sam Gilliam A Retroperspective).

When he was in school he became very successful for his hard work. At the time he went to school, he has earned his bachelor and master’s degree in fine arts from Louisville Kentucky. On Sam Gilliam spare time, he had spent time conducting workshops, taking part in panel discussions and giving talks to the people of the United States. Later Sam Gilliam had started eventually doing collage paintings in mostly black shades. Sam Gilliam became a color field painter and lyrical Abstractionist artist. Lyrical abstractionist is two related but distinctly separate trends in post war modernist painting. Some people also say Sam Gilliam work has been described as belonging to abstract expressionism and lyrical abstraction. Art that Sam Gilliam works on are on stretched, wrapped, and wrapped canvas, and adds sculptural 3d elements.The folds in the canvases, however, were not created at random but instead reflect Gilliam's specific idea about how he wanted his paintings to be installed.

The jazz musicians have influenced him and his paintings. He believes jazz leads to the acrobatic to art. Gilliam was influenced by German Expressionists such as Emil Nolde, Paul Klee and the American Bay Area Figurative School artist Nathan Oliveira. In 1963, Thomas Downing, an artist who identified himself with the Washington Color School, introduced Gilliam to this new school of thought.  He feels like he could make hundreds of fascinating, and unique paintings. He started creating dynamic geometric collages. He has more of his works located in more than ten museums. Some of the accomplishments Sam Gilliam is known for are the first artist to introduce the idea of a painted canvas hanging without stretcher bars in 1965.

Sam Gilliam decided to work with unsupported canvases. After he had seen a women hanging laundry outside the window of his Washington studio, he decided not to use a frame or stretcher for his work.He just draped and hung large pieces of paint-stained canvases from ceilings, walls, or on floors.One of his draped series of six canvases name seahorses was done for the Philadelphia Museum of Art and hangs from the outside walls of two adjacent wings of the museum the drapery of marble on ancient statues of Greek gods.

Later on in the 1970’s, he had changed his way on how he paints. Instead of him staining and saturating wet canvases he spattered and built up many layers of thick acrylic paint on them. Then later in the 1980’s he focused on making geometric collages, stretching the middle portion of his canvas and collaging onto it geometric shapes.

Sam Gilliam has been criticized for his recent work. He was being criticized for being more deeply Eurocentric then African American. Eurocentric means focusing on history to the exclusion of a wider view of the world. A lot of people in the world today has questioned him, why they don’t see any African American culture in his art work. I believe Sam Gilliam doesn’t do a lot of African American art because he wants to expand his art around the city. Most people will probably look at him and see he’s black and expect him to do more African American culture.

One time Sam Gilliam had creating an artwork for the Indians. The artwork was created so the Indians can feel appreciated for using their culture in his art. He wasn’t trying to make a bad look for them, but he wanted to show that he can create anything with every culture. Then he had thoughts about water color. A professor told him he should start doing water color because his paintings were muddy. He didn’t enjoy it because he thought they were sloppy. But then he started to use the water color as a force.

One of Sam Gilliam art I admire is in collection, New York called coffee thyme which was created in 1977. This image has random colors of specs like red, blue, green, violet, and all sorts of color shades. This artwork is an expressionist sketch, with overlapping colors, with a rectangular box at the bottom.  This portrait has many different types of shapes included like triangles, circles and diamonds. I feel that this artwork is showing me what art can look like then your usual image. The rectangular box can mean anything. It could mean a religion, an area where he come from, or just an abstract image he decided to create.

Another of Sam Gilliam works I also like is an artwork called Fire. This artwork caught my attention because of the wavy look. The artwork reminds me of the different types of sound waves you can choose on a laptop, when you are listening to music. And it has a lot of different shades to the art. It has some dark and even some bright shades. The waves have two different colors, with specs of random colors added on to it. The waves in other paintings also can go vertical and horizontal. It seems like now Sam Gilliam is starting to create a little abstract artwork.

For some reason Sam Gilliam was doing a good job from his work. Sam Gilliam was being acknowledged with many awards as an African American artist. Sam Gilliam received two National Endowment for the Arts awards, fellowships from the Washington Gallery of Modern Art and the Guggenheim Foundation, and an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from the University of Louisville in 1980. He was has received awards from Washington Gallery of Modern Art, 1968, Norman B. Harris Prize, Art Institute of Chicago,Guggenheim Fellowship, 1971, Washington Gallery Modern Art fellow, and many more to come from his great work.

Sam Gilliam had much recognition as an artist/student. He also taught at University of Louisville.  He has had many grants, awards, exhibitions, honorary decorates and many more. He holds and cherish his awards he receive because he doesn’t know when their will be a next opportunity. One of Sam Gilliam biggest work piece was held at a Conoran gallery of art in 2005. And he was name 2006 university of Louisville alumnus of the year. Another accomplishment Sam Gilliam is known for is a large color stained canvases he draped and suspended from walls and ceilings in the late 1960’s.

As I explained numerous times sam gilliam was very famous for color field paintings. It is a style characterized by large, highly simplified compositions in which the use of color is independent of line and figuration.(“ Color Field Painting Artsy.”) The black paintings is the first art pieces that he has created in 1977. These artworks are heavily textured by layering black paint over other hues and then raking the surface of the painting. These paintings showed African patchwork quilts from his childhood. In his paintings it view the teaching of art as a mission. The framework of the painting is in real space and is attracted to its power and the way it functions. The paintings had the ability to move beyond the draped canvas. Around the 1960’s there was many known political and social problems going on with african americans in the United States. It began to explode in all directions.(“Sam Gilliam”) He has been accused of ignoring the plight of blacks in his works, and essentially viewed as a traitor to his people. His paintings lack black imagery so many african americans was not inspired by his work. Locke, the first african american Rhodes scholar, the book entitled “The New Negro”, praised artist, Aaron Douglas’ works of r it proud portrayal of his people. Locke states in the book: “We ought and must have a school of Negro art, a local and racially representative tradition.”

Even early modernist artists who claimed inspiration from African sculpture and masks, and portrayed images from African artwork as sensual. In the  article (14), Making Primitive Art High Art, Duke University Professor, Marianna Torgovnick states: “Continuing and expanding an older tradition of using blacks as signs of sensuality, paintings of the modern movement, from Manet’s Olympia to Picasso’s Demoiselles d’ Avignon, had used blacks and black art in connection with debauchery, especially in the depiction of prostitution and brothel life.” Although Gilliam’s works are not overtly ethnic, and do not conjure up images of things to be feared or sexualized, they are, I would argue, African or African American. The bold patterns and colors are reminiscent of the designs found in African textiles. Artist and art historian, David C. Driskell [15], says  that Gilliam’s works are the “equivalent to jazz, blues and gospel” in black American creativity. And I believe that is a true statement that David had mentioned.  Sam Gilliam’s works are highly sought after, in this country as well as others.  Gilliam created a temporary installation entitled Of Fireflies and Ferris Wheels: Monastery Parallel, 1997, polypropylene for the chapel gallery of the Kunstmuseum Kloster Unser Lieben Frauen in Magdeburg, Germany. Also their was the, Color of Medals, 1998, that wais constructed of acrylic, polypropylene, and digital prints on birch plywood with aluminum and piano hinges, and installed at the Department of Veterans Affairs in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Gilliam spoke of the absence in quality of artistic knowledge within the black community. He questioned why the Washington, D.C riots, when whites stayed in the suburbs, museum attendance fell so drastically. I feel like it fell drastically because whites did not appreciate his artwork. It probably could have been some racism about his artwork describing African American culture.  He also spoke of the need for better art education, focusing on “the quality of aesthetic experiences available to persons within the Black community, and raising the level of this quality”(An African American Artist following his own vision).

People thought it was hard for African American artist to get known, but Sam Gilliam have proven everyone wrong. He is currently successful and other people are still buying his work. His technique he uses is going to be famous, and a lot of artist will start to use it. Most people do not really appreciate his work showing black culture such as jazz and music. He is currently successful and other people are still buying his work. All of Sam Gilliam work will have a major impact on how other artist see there paintings, and look up to him as a historical famous African American artist. Then his work will encourage other African Americans to exploit their work to other people or even the community.

 

Final Paper Work Cited

Am. S AM G ILLIAM : A N A FRICAN -A MERICAN A RTIST F OLLOWING H IS O WN (n.d.): n. pag. Web.

Binstock, Jonathan P., and Sam Gilliam. Sam Gilliam: A Retrospective. Berkeley: U of California, 2005. Print.

"Color Field Painting | Artsy." Color Field Painting | Artsy. N.p., n.d. Web.

      24 Apr. 2016.

"Sam Gilliam." Wikimedia Foundation, n.d. Web. 24 Apr. 2016.

Sam Gilliam . Youtube , Color Field Painter n.d. 

 

 

Comments (6)

Abigail Heiniger said

at 6:24 pm on Feb 10, 2016

I set this roster page up for you (it was supposed to be set up at the beginning of the semester). Please come and talk to me during office hours if you are having any trouble with the class.

Abigail Heiniger said

at 9:02 pm on Feb 27, 2016

Good discussion questions!

Abigail Heiniger said

at 9:02 pm on Feb 27, 2016

I don't see your artifact here. Happy to talk during office hours if you are having any trouble finding one.

Abigail Heiniger said

at 9:57 pm on Mar 20, 2016

Interesting blueprint of the titanic, but I don't think this will work as an artifact for American lit (it is a British ship). Happy to talk during office hours if you are having any trouble.

Abigail Heiniger said

at 9:57 pm on Mar 20, 2016

I don't see your definition of the American hero or your close reading here for the final paper.

Abigail Heiniger said

at 9:23 pm on Mar 31, 2016

I don’t see your 3-5 paragraphs describing your connection with your artifact, or secondary sources here. Why don’t you come and see me during office hours so that we can talk about your final project if you have quesitons?

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