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Cox, Danae

Page history last edited by dmcox@... 7 years, 11 months ago

Return to Roster

 

Cox, Danae

 

Major: Graphic Communications

What I hope to do with this class: Understand the basic roots of American Literature

 

1. Danae Cox

2. Personal online presentation material: 

3. Final Paper

 

 


Personal Online Presentation Material: 

Group Number-

Term:

 


Final Paper and Presentation

 

Presentation Link: Danae Cox Final Project

 

 

  1. The Nineteenth Century in Print and Making of America Project: finding an artifact from after 1865

    1. Find and identify an artifact from online databases above. 

My artifact is this photograph from the Library of Congress, representing the empowerment of black women. The name of this photo is I am a black woman! For my paper, I'm going to tie together the amazing accomplishments of Jessie Fauset from her novel "Plum Bun, A Novel Without a Moral".

 

Primary Source: Plum Bun: A Novel Without a Moral 

 

Secondary Sources:

 

Beyond the Harlem Renaissance.pdf

 

Miscegenating Middlebrow JF.pdf

 

Politics of Fulfillment vs Lost Generation.pdf

Timeline of women's rights

Ironically, in Plum Blun: A Novel Without A Moral, Jesse Fauset creates a message about the inanity/uselessness/imaginary nature... of racial construction in the United States; her novel's moral foreshadows later Civil Rights movements, illustrated by posters such as "TITLE."

 

Angela is celebrated as a white woman and an artist. Her success proved that racial categories and discrimination are meaningless in creating a heirarchy of racial class.

 

 

 

Rough Draft

Throughout history, women have to overcome many obstacles such as obtaining the right to vote, get their education, and earning other right as well. African american women also had to face prejudice and discriminatory behavior along with their lack of rights. Jessie Fauset took a stand against all odds by being a woman and leaving her husband. She didn’t let being black or being a woman determine her ability to do what she want. My artifact is a picture of a black empowered woman, which correlates with my book source because the main character took action and did what she believed in regardless of her gender.

 

Women’s suffrage was the period of time when women fought for their rights and tried to break the bender barrier. Women protested for the rights to vote mainly during this period, but other important things were fought for as well. Women didn’t want to be seen as the maid of the family anymore. They wanted to have the right of leaving their husband if they wanted to. They wanted the right of being able to stand up for themselves to anybody no matter the gender. They wanted the right to be treated equally in the workforce. The time period of this protest was from the 1840s to the 1920s. Women began to break free when they got the right to vote, but they also jumped through other social boundaries. They began to dress how they wanted to, smoke in public, and dance wildly in clubs. Women started to break free.

 

Angela Murray was a interracial woman who didn’t care what society thought about her. She was the seventh born child in her family, and she was known as the midwife of the Harlem Renaissance. Because of her interracial appearance, she passed as white a lot of times, saving her from being in many bad situations. She was rebellious in a sense because she left her husband and proceeded on with her life unlike many women of her era. She took a stand for what she believed in and didn’t care what anybody had to say about it, what connects her to the black woman in the picture artifact. That woman has no fear in her eyes, and she holds her fist up high to show that she doesn’t care how people view her. She want’s society to be equal both gender wise and race wise, just like Angela Murray in the story.

 

The artifact that I chose is of a woman on a black and white chart. Her face, afro, and fist are all black and white, but her shirt is a shade of brown as well as the background. On the side of the picture there is a color chart with the colors from the African flag on it (white, red, yellow, and green.The woman’s mouth is open as if she’s screaming to the top of her lungs. From the way she’s looking, she seems to be upset with whatever is going on at the time. Her eyes show anger, aggression, and determination. I believe that the colors of the  artifact are black and white to neutralize the color of her skin. The fist in the picture doesn’t even look like it belongs to her body. The background and the shirt shows the emphasis of how being brown is possibly the cause of her anger. So, even though her skin is black and white in the photo, she still knows that she is brown and it will surround her every day in her life. This photo correlates with the book because Angela made a choice whether or not she wanted to be represented as black or white. She didn’t make this choice because she was ashamed of her race, but she didn’t want to have to deal with the negatives that came with being black at the time. She hid though the racial discrimination and prejudices by going with a certain side of her appearance. One thing that Angela did that most black women wouldn’t do at the time is date a white man. The white man didn’t know that Angela was partially black, so he fell in love with her. Angela didn’t care about the consequences that she could’ve possibly faced if she would’ve been caught for doing such a thing. She was a powerful force that broke through to show that she didn’t care what society said.

 

My timeline shows how women’s rights increased over time. In 1888, married women were given the right to exercise fully independent legal capacity. This meant that women were allowed to be independent and live without a husband if that was what they wanted to do. In 1912, women gained access to most government administration positions. Although they were still discriminated against in the workforce, they were able to work in the government only in minor job positions. In 1920, women gained the right to vote. This was great for white women because they were able to vote without a problem. Black women were still discriminated against, so they had to take certain tests in order to be able to vote. Often times, even if they passed, they didn’t get to vote or their vote was not counted. Around 190, women were placed on equal footing with me with regard to divorce, custody of any children, and the right to property. This meant that women didn’t have to rely on whether or not the husband wanted a divorce anymore. Women were no longer stuck in unhappy marriages, and they didn’t have to fear losing their children in the process because they could gain custody. In 1938, females were allowed to serve in all positions apart from those pertaining to the clergy or the military. Women were finally able to become judges, law officials, or things of that matter. In the 1950s, full rights to serve in all official capacities were granted. Women were able to fight in war, serve their country, and honor what they love.

 

In my second secondary source, there is a group of black women gathered to speak their mind. They are seem to be fed up with the system and ways of the world. They look as if they are ready to fight, and they don’t care what the consequences are. By their facial expressions, it seems like they’ve been fighting for a long time, and now they don’t about the consequences that they face. This related to my artifact because any of these women could have been the face of that picture. Any woman in that room could have held their fist up and I believe that they would show the exact same determination in their eyes.


I believe that Angela’s journey was helpful to women because she did something that could’ve gotten her killed. She stood up to adversity even though she put herself in that situation in the first place. She didn’t care about the social norms. She didn’t think that she had to tell her man about her racial background because she was tired of being judged. She did what she had to do to make sure that she was happy, even if that meant doing something that seemed wrong at the time.

 

Final Paper 

 

 

 

 

American Literature

Danae Cox

Professor Abigail Heiniger

4/25/2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Throughout history, people had to face many obstacles because of the structure of society. Many gender and race barriers brainwashed people to believe that they were less able to succeed, accomplish, or achieve as much as the white man who seemed to be the most superior at the time. Although people felt the pressure to conform with gender and race standards, multiple brave beings stood up against the society norms. Ironically, in Plum Bun: A Novel Without a Moral, Jessie Fauset creates a message about the uselessness nature of racial construction in the United States through playing society like a game; her novels moral foreshadows later Civil Rights movements, illustrated by posters such as "I am a black woman."

 "I am a black woman," is a representation of empowerment of all women although it shows the face of a black woman. The woman's skin tone in the picture is black and white to neutralize the race barrier, meaning that women's rights weren't only being fought for amongst black women. The woman's hair is kinky like a black woman's to represent that they had it harder than other races. There are colors from the African flag on the y-axis side of the poster (white, yellow, red, and green) to represent the African heritage of black people. The colors went from white to black on the x-axis portion to represent the converting of the nation when blacks were first brought into the United Stated. The people here were basically all white, but blacks began to equal out with the whites. The background and shirt of the woman are two different shades of brown to show that she is angry with the fact that being brown will always hold her back, yet she wouldn't want to be any other color. This interpretation of the poster correlates with Angela, the main character of Plum Bun: A Novel Without A Moral, because she hides her identity of being black, but in the long run she reveals her true identity with dignity and pride.

 Early in the novel, a statement was made that generalized how life was in the 20th century. Angela stated, "At a very early age she had observed that the good things of life are unevenly distributed; merit is not always rewarded; hard labour does not necessarily entail adequate recompense." (Fauset, 12) This quote explained that there was inanity in the society that was so visible and obvious that young children were aware of it. The way of life was unfair to women and races other than white no matter how hard they worked, how much they discovered, or how much they contributed to society. It's like the people of society were in a race, but the obstacles that had to be passed in order to reach the finish line were different for females and/or blacks. There was no reason for the unfairness, which made people angrier. It's like life was a game, yet some people were entitled to win because of their gender or skin tone. In the novel, Angela dreamed of lacking color in order to fulfill her dreams because she knew that being black would hold her back from making accomplishments. Society made people like Angela believe that they weren't good enough, but she was determined to show everyone that racial construction was all a joke.

 Yes, the boundaries that gave the perception of being white or being superior is all a big game. Angela lived as a white woman while being black the whole time. She accomplished things such as becoming a well-known and well-respected author. If people would've known that she was black, many prejudice acts would've downplayed her work, which would've put a hold on her ability to be successful. People gave her praise as she pretended to be white, but if she would have come out as being black, she wouldn't have received any type of recognition. So, she was playing the game to get what she wanted. She revealed that the racial construction was purposeless because skin tone doesn't determine what a person is capable of.

 There was a time in the book where a family discussed Angela as if she was white, without knowing her true background. They stated that she was better than the usual run of niggers. They also specifically stated, "She never steals, I'd trust her with anything and she isn't what you'd call lazy either." (Fauset, 27) This specific moment portrays how ignorant society was as a whole at the time. The stereotype for African Americans was to be thieves, lazy, and not trustworthy. What's confusing about that statement is the fact that black people have been hard workers for hundreds of years back to the slave days. If they stole, they were lynched. If they were lazy, they were sold. If they did something to belittle the trust of their masters, they were punished. So, the brainwash game continued on to change the views of black people after slavery ended. They went from being the only working people in a household to being lazy. There's a vision given to the people who didn't grow up in the slave years to erase what actually happened, and give a perception of what was thought to happen. No matter how you describe slavery, you can't take away the fact that black people were taken against their will, and forced to work for nothing in return. So, a race was so lazy that they left the country just to find people to do work for them, yet they're calling the race that worked for them lazy. It's because racial construction is a pointless and African Americans will always have the short end of the stick.

 There was also a time in the book where Angela said that she felt as if she was rehearsing a well-known part of a play by saying, "Coloured! Of course, I never told you that I was coloured! Why should I?" (Fauset, 72) This quote exclaimed that skin color shouldn't even be a topic of discussion. If the entire world was blind, and we only knew each other by voice, gestures, or how people acted, would people be able to tell who was black and who was white? Would you be able to treat people differently if you couldn't see their physical appearance, or would everyone be equal?

 Angela pretending to be white was like a cheat code in a video game (a cheat code is used to advance to the next level without having to play that level). The end result of a video game is to complete the game in the best way possible, which is represented by her life in the story. She wanted to complete her life without having to go through the extra levels that black women had to go through. When Angela and her mother used to go to the grocery store and pretend to be white, it was like skipping a level of a journey. Instead of struggling in the store as two black ladies, they entered the code by acting as two white ladies. This resolved many problems throughout her game of life, although it didn't solve anything. She still had to look in the mirror and accept the fact that she was black. This wasn’t a problem though, because she was proud of her heritage. She wanted black and white equality just like any other African American. If black power was a thing of her time, she would’ve posed like the woman in my artifact at every march. But, for the time being, she had to make things happen.

 In the article Miscegenating Middlebrow by Jessie Faucet and the "Authentic" Middle class, Faucet backfired at a review of her work written by a white man. She used the phrase, "whatever is white is right." This goes to show that the equality that people were supposed to be given was nonexistent. The disrespectful comments that the reviewer left were clearly racist, which meant that people had it hard in the workforce compared to others. No matter the writing level, the whites were always made to seem like they were dominant because they had people in the system who believed the "whatever is white is right" saying. This problem in society has never been solved. With groups such as the KKK still evolving, the phrase will always be a permanent marking on the brains of Americans. African Americans will always have a restraint held on them in anything that they do while Caucasians seem to have the easier route, but many people have broken through that restraint. Oprah Winfrey is near the top of the rich list being both black and a woman. Barack Obama is the president of the United States although he is half black. Just because it's more complications for black people in the world doesn't mean that they aren't strong enough to rise through challenges. They didn't have to pretend to be white like Angela in order to achieve, but imagine if they were born in the same time period. Would they have been as successful as they are in this century? Would they have made such an impact on the world? They would have had to play the game that Angela played or their achievements would've been cut short, although they don't have the mixed physical appearance.

 After Angela settled for pretending to be a white woman, she realized that passing was no panacea. She thought she has everything figured out, but she began to face gender discrimination as well. Women didn't have half of the job opportunities that men had in Philadelphia. How was this acknowledging the fact that everyone was made equal? Men and women both have the same blood flowing through their veins. They are both made up of the same arteries, cells, and bones. They both have brains and thought processes that are capable of producing, so why should men have more choices in the workplace than women- Discrimination. Men were still seen as the dominant force regardless of if they had to pretend like everyone was receiving an equal opportunity. Angela stated, "I'm sick of this business being below or above a certain norm. Doesn't anyone think that we have a right to be happy simply, naturally?" (Fauset, 54) Being happy shouldn't be engraved into our minds as we grow. Women shouldn't feel entitled to cooking, cleaning, and taking care of the kids just because they're feminine and supportive beings. From the prior centuries, the social norm is for women to do what they're told by their husbands. If women were able to listen to their husbands and do what they were told in the past, why wouldn't they be able to listen and produce in the workplace? Angela thought that this was unjust, and she believed that women should take a stand for what they believed in. This was influenced by women's suffrage and feminism.

 Women's suffrage was the period of time when women fought for their rights and tried to break the gender barrier. Women protested for the rights to vote mainly during this period, but other important things were fought for as well. Women didn't want to be seen as the maid of the family anymore. They wanted to be treated and seen as equals to the male. They wanted to be treated equally in the workforce. The time period of the protest was from the 1840s to the 1920s. Women began to break free when they received the right to vote, but they also jumped through other social boundaries. They began to dress how they wanted to, smoke in public, and dance wildly in clubs without a care in the world. Women finally began to break free.

            One of my sources is a timeline emphasizing the historical context of the increasing of women's rights over time.  In 1888, married women were given the right to exercise fully independent legal capacity, meaning that they were allowed to own land and live husband free if that's what they desired. In 1912, women gained access to most government administration positions. Although they were still discriminated against in the workforce, they were able to work in the government only in minor job positions. In 1920, women gained the right to vote, which was a phenomenal accomplishment for white women. Black women were still discriminated against, so they had to take certain tests in order to place their votes. Often times, even if they passed, their vote was not counted. Around 1930, women were placed on equal footing with men with regard to divorce, custody of any children, and the right to property. This meant that women were able to get out of unhappy marriages regardless of how the husband felt, and they didn't have to fear losing their children to their husbands. In 1938, females were allowed to serve in all positions apart from those pertaining to the clergy or the military. Women were finally able to become judges, law officials, and other positions that have a place to change things that are going on in the government. In the 1950s, fell rights to serve in all official capacities were granted. Women were able to fight in a war, serve their country, and honor what they love.

 In another secondary source, there is photograph of a group of black women gathered to speak their minds. They all seem to be fed up with the system and ways of the world. They look as if they are ready to fight, and they don't care about the consequences anymore. By their facial expressions, it seems like they've been fighting for a long time. They seem tired of having to deal with the unfairness that was present in that time period. This relates to my artifact because any of the women pictured could have replaced the woman on the "I am a black woman" poster. Any of those women could have held their fist up, and I believe that they would show the exact same determination in their eyes. In Plum Bun, Angela and any of her sisters could have been in this picture because they had the same feelings as other black women. They dealt with the same problems, so it's implied that they had the same attitude on the subject.

 I believe that Angela's journey was helpful to women because she did something that could have gotten herself killed. Although it may be offensive to some black women that she pretended to be something else, she showed people that as long as you play the game, you could come out on top. She proved that racism meant nothing. In the inside, she was holding her fist up representing who she really was, like the woman in the poster "I am a black woman!" She stood up to adversity even though she put herself in that situation in the first place. She had the power. She didn't care about the social norms because from the beginning she knew that none of it had a meaning. She didn't think that she had to tell her boyfriend about her racial background because she knew she'd be judged. If he loved her for being her, he shouldn't have cared about her race in the first place. She did what she had to do to make sure she was happy, even if that meant doing something that seemed wrong at the time.

 In the article The Case for Black Modernist Writers by Adrienne Gosselin, American Modernism is described, giving an explanation of how important black writers and female writers were at the time. This movement was vital to the expansion of literature created by African Americans and women because they expanded literature by adding different cultural traditions. Different viewpoints of on subjects were presented in this movement, which was a huge breakthrough for society. Many new things were brought to light, so it's like the entire United States entered a new learning period. It went to show that people were equal in an educational aspect, so no race or gender was more intelligent or more capable. Women produced works of the same nature as men, and some of the work was nearly identical. Black people produced works with the same background as white people, and their work was similar as well. Angela had this same concept in her head as she produced work as a "white woman" in a black woman's body. If people were to take writing from a black man author, black woman author, white man author, and white woman author and read them, how would people determine who wrote what? Other than a possible language differential, or cultural view, the works would be similar in many ways, which exhibits the point that all people are equal.

 By the end of the story, Angela witnessed a girl being discriminated against. The girl was being told that she didn't deserve something simply because she was a negro. Angela finally put herself out there by telling everyone in that moment that she was a black woman. She won the game! She proved everyone wrong. At this moment, she could've raised her first like the woman in my artifact. The emotions and attitude at that point were the exact same. She showed that the world was wrong for trying to distinct black from white, or woman from man. She'd shown that the prior belief of superiority was wrong. Angela received rewards and recognition, therefore, the girl should be able to do the same. If that girl had been mixed and pretended to be white, she would've been awarded with no question. That was the big lesson behind everything; we are not our skin. We are not our gender. We are all people.

 To this day, women and African Americans are still trying to break the barrier made in society.  There are feminist groups, the NAACP, and other organizations that want everyone to be seen as equal. One accomplishment that is in the process of being made is making Harriet Tubman the first African American, and first woman face of a bill. Slow steps are being taken to acknowledge equality. Women continue to be discriminated against in different ways, but there have been so many heroic female figures in this generation. We have a woman running for president in the 2016 election, which was once never even heard of. After everything that women and African Americans went through, they still have to play a game. Women still have to gain rights politically, and African Americans still have to face racism and discrimination. Sometimes, I feel like black women still feel the need to pose like the woman in my artifact because full equality between races and genders may never be reached. Angela showed us that if you play the game right, you can show the stupidity of the people in society. How long will we have to play a game in order to receive equality?

 

                                                                 Bibliography

 

Cutter, Martha J. Unruly Tongue: Identity and Voice in American Women's Writing, 1850-1930. Jackson: U of Mississippi, 1999. Print.

 

Fauset, Jessie Redmon. Plum Bun: A Novel without a Moral. Boston: Beacon, 1990. Print.

 

Gosselin, Adrienne Johnson. "Beyond the Harlem Renaissance: The Case for Black Modernist Writers." Modern Language Studies 26.4 (1996): 37. Web. 11 Apr. 2016.

 

Harker, Jaime. America the Middlebrow: Women's Novels, Progressivism, and Middlebrow Authorship between the Wars. Amherst: U of Massachusetts, 2007. Print.

 

Schenck, Mary Jane. "Jessie Fauset: The Politics of Fulfillment vs. the Lost Generation." South Atlantic Review 66.1 (2001): 102. Web. 11 Apr. 2016.

 

 

Name (paper): Danae Cox

Name (reviewer 1): Courtney Kendrick 

Name (reviewer 2): Tyra Jackson

American Literature I Final Paper Rubric

 

 

Satisfactory

Unsatisfactory

Comments

Organization

Strong thesis at the conclusion of the introduction to guide the paper.

Thesis connected and supported in all body paragraphs.

Thesis makes a strong argument about a single theme or idea using the primary text and artifact.

Discussion of the primary text and artifact is coherent and succinct.  

Thesis is vague or spread throughout the introduction and the paper.

Thesis is not clearly connected to all body paragraphs.

Thesis does not make a strong argument about the primary text and/or artifact.

 

Close Reading

Analyzes the theme of the American hero in or through a primary text and artifact. 

Close reading brings the primary text and artifact together in meaningful ways.

Places close reading in conversation with secondary sources.

Summarizes and paraphrases evidence from the primary text to support the close reading (only using direct quotes when it is necessary to analyze the language).

Does not clearly analyze a theme from American Literature in or through a primary text and/or artifact.

Close reading does not relate the primary text and artifact in meaningful ways (although it may discuss both separately).

Does not situate close reading among secondary sources.

Primarily summarizes the text or quotes it (rather than analyzing it). 

 

Support (Research)

Integrates support from secondary sources to support close reading.

Creates a clear conversation with secondary sources (without being overpowered by them).

Uses strong evidence from secondary sources. 

Summarizes and paraphrases evidence except when quotations are necessary.

Does not integrate support from secondary sources. 

Argument is either overpowered or disconnected from secondary sources.

Evidence from secondary sources is not clearly connected with the argument.

Uses unnecessary quotes from the secondary source. 

 

Pre-Writing

Completed all pre-writing activities on-time (including conferencesand rough draft workshop)

Did not complete all pre-writing activities on-time.

 

Presentation

Addresses the main points of the paper in a succinct and engaging way.

Interactive and creative online presentation with text and visual elements (NOT a power point)

Does not address the main points of the paper.

Is not interactive or online.

Does not include text and/or visual elements.

 

 

 

 

    •   Thesis and Outline. Due 4/6/16. 
    • Revising a Paper. Due 4/15/16.  
  • Rough Draft Workshop 4/15/16. 
  • Conferences 4/18-22/16.
  • Final Presentations 4/25-27/16. 
  • Final Project 4/25/16

 

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Outline and Theses

Throughout history, women have to overcome many obstacles such as obtaining the right to vote, get their education, and earning other right as well. African american women also had to face prejudice and discriminatory behavior along with their lack of rights. Jessie Fauset took a stand against all odds by being a woman and leaving her husband. She didn’t let being black or being a woman determine her ability to do what she want. My artifact is a picture of a black empowered woman, which correlates with my book source because the main character took action and did what she believed in regardless of her gender.

 

I. Background of women’s suffrage

  1. The restrictions of women in history

  2. When were the rights given

  3. What were the punishments if rules were broken

 

II. Jessie Fauset’s story ("Plum Bun, A Novel Without a Moral")

  1. Information about her journey

  2. Challenges she faced along the way

  3. Results of her journey, and her ability to overcomes

 

III. Artifact

  1. Personal description

  2. How it ties with the book

  3. More in depth description

 

IV. Secondary Sources

  1. Ties to the book

  2. Ties to the artifact

  3. Information behind secondary sources

 

V. Personal Beliefs

  1. How helpful her journey was to women realization

  2. How it shows that women with rights aren’t so bad

  3. Talk about how women are statistically in society (college attendance, accomplishments, changes they’ve made)

 

VI. Author’s background and other journeys

  1. Background of the book

  2. Author’s younger life and other journeys

  3. Authors accomplishments with women’s suffrage

 

VII. More ties and connections

  1. Info

  2. Info

  3. Wrap up

VIII. Conclusion

 


Coursework

 

1. The main purpose of the first text is the fact that short stories are a new fad. It's believed that short stories are more enjoyable because they get right to the point without having to read a whole novel. The evidence that the author gave was the fact that this generation is centered around social media, meaning that we are used to reading shorter amounts of texts. With that being said, we enjoy shorter stories.

2. We can relate these to the two short stories that we had because they tell a complete story in a short amount of text. They take away super specific details and get down to the point.

3. In the "Cannibals and Explorers" short story, the Cannibals worship the explorers and they're envious in their eyes. Because of this, they ate their vital body parts in order to become more like them. They also went back to teach about cannibalism, yet they were the cannibals. It's believable that the Cannibals ate the other explorers that they admired, then lied on the Native Americans saying that it was them.

4. I believe that the story was related to the history of the conflict between Native Americans and the Europeans because both of the groups had to watch their backs. They seemed to be friends, and everyone portrayed a mutual friendship, yet anything could happen. There was no trust between the two groups even though they were supposed to be considered friends. In Benavidez's story, his own friends turned on him and killed him because the trust that he thought was there, wasn't there.

5. I believe that Juan Martinez is saying that customer service is based around chivalry because if you don't attract customers front he way that you treat them, then you won't have customers. In modern life, when you make a relationship with a customer, you gain them as a customer for life. When you look out for your customers, they look out for you. When you treat your customers well and interact with them, you'll have a significantly smaller chance of going out of business. 

 

Guest Lecture Questions

1. The genre shapes the narrative because the fact that the writing is nonfiction allows things to be factual, therefore it has a true hero. Other genres that we've read such as the Daybreakers have the opposite genre and same narrative characteristics.

2. A nonfiction novel can have a hero. This nonfiction story has a hero because the main character is illiterate, yet he contributed to things such as the navy, which is a heroic act.

3. The character of Manjiro Nakahama is developed through negative imagery. He was stated to be a runaway and illiterate, which made me picture a homeless man. The author wanted to build the character.

4. His experience explained that we have a lot of opportunities in our World that we take for granted. It made us see that to people from other countries, this is the place to be.

5. He becomes a part of the heroic native because he has a call to action which is a better opportunity, he fights the obstacles and comes out on top. He provides things that were needed,  which is considered a heroic act in my eyes.

6. It shows how much he traveled back and forth.

7. He stayed on the same path, but he kept leaving and coming back?

 

The American Hero in the World Questions

 

 

  1. Would he rather live in Japan or the U.S.? And why does he make the decision to live where he does?

 

I believe that he would’ve rather stayed in the United States because in our country he would be able to accomplish a lot. There would be better opportunities with his skills in our country as well. I believe that he made the decision to live where he does because of family reasons.

 

2. How does Manjiro relate to the ocean?

 

I believe that he relates to the ocean because of the fact that he’s exploring and on the move like a person who travels the ocean is. Also, you can only go as far as he did if you travel the ocean. He had to cross the major bodies of water in order to get to the different country.

 

3. If the roles switched, could Manjiro have been successful?

 

I believe that his success would’ve been different if roles switched. If he would’ve kept working, he could’ve had a different life outcome. But, the success that he achieved came from his ability to travel and see/ learn new things. So, he could’ve been successful, but you never know.

 

4. Give 2 examples of continuity in major experiences and relationships with people in different places.

 

His drive and determination made his relationships what they were. He was treated badly at times, but his motivation moved him to making him want to gain good relationships in order to achieve more success.

 

 

 

 

 

Comments (7)

Abigail Heiniger said

at 8:43 pm on Feb 27, 2016

I don't see your questions/responses for the guest lecture here. Let me know if I missed them. I don't see your artifact here. Happy to talk during office hours if you are having any trouble finding one.

dmcox@... said

at 1:20 pm on Mar 30, 2016

I had them on paper, but I can type them up. And I recently found an artifact, but I'm in the process of finding sources.

Abigail Heiniger said

at 9:44 pm on Mar 20, 2016

I don't see any of your material for the final paper here.

dmcox@... said

at 1:20 pm on Mar 30, 2016

I'm still sort've confused about the final project, but I plan on meeting with you during office hours tomorrow.

Abigail Heiniger said

at 9:09 pm on Mar 31, 2016

I don’t see your connection with your artifact, or secondary sources here. Why don’t you come and see me during office hours so that we can talk about your final project?

Courtney Kendrick said

at 1:50 pm on Apr 15, 2016

paragraph 1, there isn't a clear thesis in this first paragraph. what argument are you taking here?
paragraph 2, I think that the second paragraph is very clear with the point you are trying to get across.
paragraph 3, good summary of the book. i feel as though this should be maybe your second paragraph because it is an overview of the book to summary.
paragraph 4, I think your paragraph on the artifact timing in with you book is very clear and very god use of creative language.
paragraph5 and 6, maybe you can do a closer reading with secondary sources and just picking things to really just back up your opinion. just pick little lines and then decribe how you are interpret that line.

Tyra Jackson said

at 10:22 pm on Apr 16, 2016

I think that you overall have a great understanding on what you are supporting in your paper. You also have a great idea on what you will be arguing against as well.
In your first paragraph, you should focus on grammatical errors. By that I mean just focusing on the "tense" of your paper and the words in which you use.
In the second paragraph, you jump start your paper in a very interesting way. I kept reading because I wanted to know more! You provided me with information that kept me engaged and kept me on my toes to see how you would back yourself up and support your work. I can see that you have a very strong belief in the support of women by the way that you carry yourself in your writing.
In your third paragraph, I think that you should talk about Angela Murray in a more powerful way. She seems to be a strong character and a very important character as well. You should just provide a better transition into talking about Angela.
Your explanation of your artifact is absolutely great. You are very descriptive with the picture and you kind of provide a story for the background of the picture. If you have ever heard the saying, "A picture is worth a thousand words" that truly is supported here. Anyone with experience in that era could pretty much relate to the strength of that picture. Not just individuals who experienced conflict in that time era but also those who were raised by families who dealt with racial issues can relate. As a matter of fact, anyone can relate in their own way and it provides a deep meaning behind it which is really great for your paper!
Your secondary sources are really strong and supportive as well. I really look forward to seeing the final version of your paper. Good Luck!

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